Yes, it's back.

I thought I'd noticed it the other day.  But dismissed it, as possibly just a dribble down the side of the cup.  But no, today again, it was clear as anything.  My coffee, slowly seeping through the wall of my cup.   That's just freaking weird, you know?  I mean, is the coffee too strong?  Is the cup too weak?  I figure it must be that the cups are cheap, though I can't figure out why they are so cheap when they cost me 20 cents.  (If I use my own mug coffee is only 50 cents, as opposed to 70 cents using the disposable.  Yes, I should really not be going for the disposable cups, it's bad for the environment, etc.  I'm aware that in some instances, I'm a git, and no there isn't an excuse.)  I mean, if the cups were some kind of special biodegradable cup, I'd understand that they aren't perfectly impermeable.  But my instincts say that a cup is meant to contain a liquid, and that if said cup cannot contain said liquid, your options are: cup is defective or liquid is dangerous.  Frankly, I wouldn't be surprised if this were a little of both.  
Yes, it's back.

I thought I'd noticed it the other day.  But dismissed it, as possibly just a dribble down the side of the cup.  But no, today again, it was clear as anything.  My coffee, slowly seeping through the wall of my cup.   That's just freaking weird, you know?  I mean, is the coffee too strong?  Is the cup too weak?  I figure it must be that the cups are cheap, though I can't figure out why they are so cheap when they cost me 20 cents.  (If I use my own mug coffee is only 50 cents, as opposed to 70 cents using the disposable.  Yes, I should really not be going for the disposable cups, it's bad for the environment, etc.  I'm aware that in some instances, I'm a git, and no there isn't an excuse.)  I mean, if the cups were some kind of special biodegradable cup, I'd understand that they aren't perfectly impermeable.  But my instincts say that a cup is meant to contain a liquid, and that if said cup cannot contain said liquid, your options are: cup is defective or liquid is dangerous.  Frankly, I wouldn't be surprised if this were a little of both.  
temporus: (yawn)
( Nov. 7th, 2007 09:43 am)
You know it's going to be one of those days, when a Starbucks Venti of their strongest brew barely puts a dent in your tired.

I guess I could go buy a cup of the corporate brew.  But, really, if a Starbucks doesn't do the trick, would a generic columbian office brew really be up to the task?   Good thing I don't have to drive long distances, or move heavy objects.

Oh wait, um...strike that on both counts.  
Tags:
temporus: (yawn)
( Nov. 7th, 2007 09:43 am)
You know it's going to be one of those days, when a Starbucks Venti of their strongest brew barely puts a dent in your tired.

I guess I could go buy a cup of the corporate brew.  But, really, if a Starbucks doesn't do the trick, would a generic columbian office brew really be up to the task?   Good thing I don't have to drive long distances, or move heavy objects.

Oh wait, um...strike that on both counts.  
Tags:
Last time I checked, styrofoam cups were not supposed to be sufficiently porous so that coffee can slowly seep through the side of the cup.  Or did I miss a change in the laws of physics somewhere?  I'm pretty sure when you put beverages in a cup, its supposed to leave the cup by going over the brim.   That is the general concept behind cup, no?  This isn't a joke dribble cup either.  This is an ordinary, off the stack cup.  And this isn't the first time I've seen this.  

Yes, I know the obvious answer is to drink my coffee faster, and stop worrying.  Or get a ceramic mug.   Or perhaps be more worried; could the coffee be so caustic that its eating through the cup?  Gah.  This is the problem with me BC (that's Before Coffee)  I can't actually formulate a useful plan.  At least the process of seeping through the cup cools off the liquid, so that it's not burning to hold the cup.  That would suck.
Last time I checked, styrofoam cups were not supposed to be sufficiently porous so that coffee can slowly seep through the side of the cup.  Or did I miss a change in the laws of physics somewhere?  I'm pretty sure when you put beverages in a cup, its supposed to leave the cup by going over the brim.   That is the general concept behind cup, no?  This isn't a joke dribble cup either.  This is an ordinary, off the stack cup.  And this isn't the first time I've seen this.  

Yes, I know the obvious answer is to drink my coffee faster, and stop worrying.  Or get a ceramic mug.   Or perhaps be more worried; could the coffee be so caustic that its eating through the cup?  Gah.  This is the problem with me BC (that's Before Coffee)  I can't actually formulate a useful plan.  At least the process of seeping through the cup cools off the liquid, so that it's not burning to hold the cup.  That would suck.
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