So, being somewhat borderline on the obsessive scale, I typically keep first drafts of all my stories.  There's a little folder "Drafts" on my PC.  Sometimes I even keep the in-between drafts too.   And because I am the curious type, I wanted to compare my first drafts to my "finished" drafts.   I don't have every first draft.   Some of the stories I ran through are stuff old enough to be retired from sending around, stuff I did in college, before I had a "PC" and so, while I might have older drafts, they would be sitting on my Commodore Amiga.  Which still works, and is sitting in the basement, but isn't going to help me these days.

So I had about 10 first drafts to compare.   What I found was, to me at least, interesting.  In eight out of ten cases, the edited stories when compared to their first drafts became more neutral.   That is, when you compared the male/female counts, the gap between these numbers shrank.   So stories that were "male" became slightly less male, and stories that were "female" became slightly less female.  One story barely changed at all, the gap changed by one point.  The last one skewed more masculine.  But only by about 50 points.  Whereas most of the others when they changed moved by several hundred points towards the center. 

Looks like my editing process tries to reign things in a little.  Either that, or their specific words are often among those that I try to weed out.  

On other writing news, I'm taking a stab at writing a few articles for my writing group newsletter.  I managed to get a few drafts done last night, so even though no new fiction has been worked on yet, I did get a couple thousand words written.  It's a nice contrast to write a little non-fiction in the meantime.  In the wings, I'm sketching out some changes to make for my next revision.  Which I would have tackled as well, if I had realized that I was going to have more free time last night than I originally expected.  But hindsight and all that.
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So, being somewhat borderline on the obsessive scale, I typically keep first drafts of all my stories.  There's a little folder "Drafts" on my PC.  Sometimes I even keep the in-between drafts too.   And because I am the curious type, I wanted to compare my first drafts to my "finished" drafts.   I don't have every first draft.   Some of the stories I ran through are stuff old enough to be retired from sending around, stuff I did in college, before I had a "PC" and so, while I might have older drafts, they would be sitting on my Commodore Amiga.  Which still works, and is sitting in the basement, but isn't going to help me these days.

So I had about 10 first drafts to compare.   What I found was, to me at least, interesting.  In eight out of ten cases, the edited stories when compared to their first drafts became more neutral.   That is, when you compared the male/female counts, the gap between these numbers shrank.   So stories that were "male" became slightly less male, and stories that were "female" became slightly less female.  One story barely changed at all, the gap changed by one point.  The last one skewed more masculine.  But only by about 50 points.  Whereas most of the others when they changed moved by several hundred points towards the center. 

Looks like my editing process tries to reign things in a little.  Either that, or their specific words are often among those that I try to weed out.  

On other writing news, I'm taking a stab at writing a few articles for my writing group newsletter.  I managed to get a few drafts done last night, so even though no new fiction has been worked on yet, I did get a couple thousand words written.  It's a nice contrast to write a little non-fiction in the meantime.  In the wings, I'm sketching out some changes to make for my next revision.  Which I would have tackled as well, if I had realized that I was going to have more free time last night than I originally expected.  But hindsight and all that.
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This has been making a run around the internet these days.   It's a site that checks the gender of your writing, supposedly to determine if you are a man or a woman who is writing.  Not sure I believe you could ever tell on such a small set of key words.  However, it is fun to pump in text and see the results.

Check out the Gender Genie

Okay, so how did I fare?  I found the results interesting.  Out of 14 completed stories (I didn't bother with just snippets as I quickly observed that portions of a story might present different results from the whole) 10 came out as Male, and 4 as Female.  The stories that registered as "Female" were so by a large margin.    Most of the stories that registered as Male, did so by much smaller margins, often within a very small percent.  A few I wonder if a different edit might have skewed them the other way.    I wasn't able to accurately predict which stories I thought would register one way or another.  As I ran through, I made little theories:  stories with internal conflict would all register as female, where those with external conflict would register as male.  *bzzzz*   Though my most outlandishly violent story did come up decisively male, other stories of action were much closer to a middle ground than I expected.  Other stories, where the crux of it is internal conflict, and somewhat personal, came out male as well.  And some female.  So that theory went out the window. 

Then I thought, well perhaps it would be those stories where female characters play a stronger role.  Two out of the four "female" stories did have substantial female characters.  Another one does make references to the main characters wife, but the fourth doesn't have a woman at all.  On the other hand, four of the "male" stories have substantial female characters, or several.   My thought there was logical, since she her and hers, were 3 of the 16 "female" signifiers, I figure a story without a female character was much less likely to produce a high "female" score.  Interestingly, the existence of male characters is irrelevant, as the counter words, he him and his, are not among the words counted.  

I was tempted to run my novel through, to see how it fared.  But, I thought that 153K words would break the page.  Maybe not.  But I didn't want to push it. 

I make no claims to the accuracy of such a tool.  Nor do I know what to make of it, when it can vary quite this much for one writer.
I can only say this:  It's an amusing way to waste a little time.   And it also inspired me to take out an old piece, and actually type it in to get a read on it.   However, one old story was my limit.  I've got 1/3 of a new story done, and I need to get cracking on that.  
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This has been making a run around the internet these days.   It's a site that checks the gender of your writing, supposedly to determine if you are a man or a woman who is writing.  Not sure I believe you could ever tell on such a small set of key words.  However, it is fun to pump in text and see the results.

Check out the Gender Genie

Okay, so how did I fare?  I found the results interesting.  Out of 14 completed stories (I didn't bother with just snippets as I quickly observed that portions of a story might present different results from the whole) 10 came out as Male, and 4 as Female.  The stories that registered as "Female" were so by a large margin.    Most of the stories that registered as Male, did so by much smaller margins, often within a very small percent.  A few I wonder if a different edit might have skewed them the other way.    I wasn't able to accurately predict which stories I thought would register one way or another.  As I ran through, I made little theories:  stories with internal conflict would all register as female, where those with external conflict would register as male.  *bzzzz*   Though my most outlandishly violent story did come up decisively male, other stories of action were much closer to a middle ground than I expected.  Other stories, where the crux of it is internal conflict, and somewhat personal, came out male as well.  And some female.  So that theory went out the window. 

Then I thought, well perhaps it would be those stories where female characters play a stronger role.  Two out of the four "female" stories did have substantial female characters.  Another one does make references to the main characters wife, but the fourth doesn't have a woman at all.  On the other hand, four of the "male" stories have substantial female characters, or several.   My thought there was logical, since she her and hers, were 3 of the 16 "female" signifiers, I figure a story without a female character was much less likely to produce a high "female" score.  Interestingly, the existence of male characters is irrelevant, as the counter words, he him and his, are not among the words counted.  

I was tempted to run my novel through, to see how it fared.  But, I thought that 153K words would break the page.  Maybe not.  But I didn't want to push it. 

I make no claims to the accuracy of such a tool.  Nor do I know what to make of it, when it can vary quite this much for one writer.
I can only say this:  It's an amusing way to waste a little time.   And it also inspired me to take out an old piece, and actually type it in to get a read on it.   However, one old story was my limit.  I've got 1/3 of a new story done, and I need to get cracking on that.  
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