Have you ever waited in a long line, then someone cut?   If you are in the cafeteria, that sort of behavior isn't usually tolerated.  But somehow, when you are behind a several ton vehicle, people feel quite willing to just cut you off, as if you didn't have a right to be in line at all.  Clearly, they were more important.

My exit from the highway frequently gets backed up.  And it gets congested enough that people get into a line to exit the highway, trying to stay out of the way of the traffic, to let it pass.   After the ramp, you have to do a little merge with a few other highways, and off ramps.  It's a bit tedious in the way only New Jersey roads can quite make them.   Once I'm on the smaller highway, there is a little wait, perhaps half mile no more, before the next turn off.   This half mile distance is graced with a full shoulder, enough room that a person could, if necessary drive their car.   When you're in the lane, waiting to exit, knowing that most of the traffic ahead of you is going straight, it can be tempting to duck out onto the shoulder and skip through the traffic.   But, that's both dangerous, and wrong.  The rule is clear, you don't drive on the shoulder just to avoid the traffic.  You don't know how many people in front of you are also looking to take that exit, and you don't know when they might be pulling into the exit lane.   Perhaps they are avoiding a bad merge.  Most of this half mile is jammed with five lanes of traffic condensing to two.  Its an exercise in waiting your turn, and learning to merge politely.

But there's always someone, who doesn't want to play nice.  Who feels it's perfectly cool to just zip past everyone (passing on the right, which is after all also a no-no) and not have to wait through all the merges, and negotiated traffic, etc.   Often, they get away with it, because there's not much you can do.  Sure, you could slide your car to the right a little, and attempt to block the shoulder, but that isn't exactly safe to do.  This time, however, I had only to watch.  As the person in the car (too far to tell man or woman) came zipping along, passing car, after car of stopped traffic, they made a little mistake.  Unbeknown to them, hidden among that line of people patiently waiting was a car that while it contained no outward markings, somehow in the rear-view, gave off the right aura of a police car.   Right near this exit ramp are both a local town police station, and the state police station, so cops being in the vicinity is quite common.   I held my breath, was I right?   A few seconds past that car, with no movement, I thought I had misjudged it, and that this would be one more person to go on with no repercussions.

And then, a light starts to flash.  Before the car catches up to mine, the car I had spotted was behind him, and lights flashing.  I smiled.  Then the line of cars began to move, and I was off, heading to the off ramp, leaving the car pulled over on the shoulder behind.  
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Have you ever waited in a long line, then someone cut?   If you are in the cafeteria, that sort of behavior isn't usually tolerated.  But somehow, when you are behind a several ton vehicle, people feel quite willing to just cut you off, as if you didn't have a right to be in line at all.  Clearly, they were more important.

My exit from the highway frequently gets backed up.  And it gets congested enough that people get into a line to exit the highway, trying to stay out of the way of the traffic, to let it pass.   After the ramp, you have to do a little merge with a few other highways, and off ramps.  It's a bit tedious in the way only New Jersey roads can quite make them.   Once I'm on the smaller highway, there is a little wait, perhaps half mile no more, before the next turn off.   This half mile distance is graced with a full shoulder, enough room that a person could, if necessary drive their car.   When you're in the lane, waiting to exit, knowing that most of the traffic ahead of you is going straight, it can be tempting to duck out onto the shoulder and skip through the traffic.   But, that's both dangerous, and wrong.  The rule is clear, you don't drive on the shoulder just to avoid the traffic.  You don't know how many people in front of you are also looking to take that exit, and you don't know when they might be pulling into the exit lane.   Perhaps they are avoiding a bad merge.  Most of this half mile is jammed with five lanes of traffic condensing to two.  Its an exercise in waiting your turn, and learning to merge politely.

But there's always someone, who doesn't want to play nice.  Who feels it's perfectly cool to just zip past everyone (passing on the right, which is after all also a no-no) and not have to wait through all the merges, and negotiated traffic, etc.   Often, they get away with it, because there's not much you can do.  Sure, you could slide your car to the right a little, and attempt to block the shoulder, but that isn't exactly safe to do.  This time, however, I had only to watch.  As the person in the car (too far to tell man or woman) came zipping along, passing car, after car of stopped traffic, they made a little mistake.  Unbeknown to them, hidden among that line of people patiently waiting was a car that while it contained no outward markings, somehow in the rear-view, gave off the right aura of a police car.   Right near this exit ramp are both a local town police station, and the state police station, so cops being in the vicinity is quite common.   I held my breath, was I right?   A few seconds past that car, with no movement, I thought I had misjudged it, and that this would be one more person to go on with no repercussions.

And then, a light starts to flash.  Before the car catches up to mine, the car I had spotted was behind him, and lights flashing.  I smiled.  Then the line of cars began to move, and I was off, heading to the off ramp, leaving the car pulled over on the shoulder behind.  
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temporus: (roar)
( Feb. 28th, 2007 08:51 am)
This morning I went into Starbucks to get a coffee on my trip to work.  The Little Man had a rough night, which means we all had a rough night, and I needed the coffee now instead of after I got to work.

Now, the new Starbucks has a weird layout thing about it, where due to the storefront on the strip mall, you have to park around back behind the store, get out, and walk around the whole store to enter from the front.   It's not exactly the way I would have laid things out, but that's just the way it is.   

This morning however, as I turn the corner to go around behind the store, I almost plow into a lady's car who decided she didn't need to pull the extra 50+ feet into the parking lot and park, but instead just parked her car right there in the road.  I just don't get people.  Why does she believe its perfectly okay for her to park there, instead of in the same lot as everyone else.  Just about five of us all pulled in at roughly the same time, she's the only one who decided to park on the "street" instead of in the lot.   Why is she special?   I didn't see handicap tags or plates.  Nothing visibly wrong (though I am very well aware that one should not judge on that alone, after having dated someone with MS in the past.  Not every condition is visible to the naked eye.)   It wasn't particularly cold this morning.  I didn't even need my hat or gloves, and I'm wearing a short sleeved shirt.   (Under the jacket of course.)  It just appeared to me that she wanted, A) to cut the line, and B) to not have to walk as far as the lot.  

Well, the justice part of this story is where though she was the first of us five to order, and I the last, whatever she ordered took so long, that the other four of us got our drinks and snacks, paid, put in sugar and cream, and left the store, got into our cars, and drove away, and she was still standing there waiting for her drink.

Ha!

Take that.

Okay, maybe its not justice, or karma, or anything.  Maybe its petty that I think to myself she deserved to be delayed since she was so self important as to feel she was so special that she could park on the street and block traffic, instead of parking in the lot like everyone else.  Maybe, I'm just picking on someone who is doing their own thing, setting themselves out from the crowd, and doesn't want to meekly be a sheep.

But I still say: Ha!  Take that.  Your nefarious plan failed.

Tags:
temporus: (roar)
( Feb. 28th, 2007 08:51 am)
This morning I went into Starbucks to get a coffee on my trip to work.  The Little Man had a rough night, which means we all had a rough night, and I needed the coffee now instead of after I got to work.

Now, the new Starbucks has a weird layout thing about it, where due to the storefront on the strip mall, you have to park around back behind the store, get out, and walk around the whole store to enter from the front.   It's not exactly the way I would have laid things out, but that's just the way it is.   

This morning however, as I turn the corner to go around behind the store, I almost plow into a lady's car who decided she didn't need to pull the extra 50+ feet into the parking lot and park, but instead just parked her car right there in the road.  I just don't get people.  Why does she believe its perfectly okay for her to park there, instead of in the same lot as everyone else.  Just about five of us all pulled in at roughly the same time, she's the only one who decided to park on the "street" instead of in the lot.   Why is she special?   I didn't see handicap tags or plates.  Nothing visibly wrong (though I am very well aware that one should not judge on that alone, after having dated someone with MS in the past.  Not every condition is visible to the naked eye.)   It wasn't particularly cold this morning.  I didn't even need my hat or gloves, and I'm wearing a short sleeved shirt.   (Under the jacket of course.)  It just appeared to me that she wanted, A) to cut the line, and B) to not have to walk as far as the lot.  

Well, the justice part of this story is where though she was the first of us five to order, and I the last, whatever she ordered took so long, that the other four of us got our drinks and snacks, paid, put in sugar and cream, and left the store, got into our cars, and drove away, and she was still standing there waiting for her drink.

Ha!

Take that.

Okay, maybe its not justice, or karma, or anything.  Maybe its petty that I think to myself she deserved to be delayed since she was so self important as to feel she was so special that she could park on the street and block traffic, instead of parking in the lot like everyone else.  Maybe, I'm just picking on someone who is doing their own thing, setting themselves out from the crowd, and doesn't want to meekly be a sheep.

But I still say: Ha!  Take that.  Your nefarious plan failed.

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